Sunday Lists: The Wonders of Wiki

This week I debated writing a list of my own for Sunday, but then found a lovely meta-list on wikipedia – a list of book lists! How could I resist exploring then sharing. The meta-list provides lots of exploring options. This is what I found interesting at first glance:

1. A list of bagpipe books. Who knew?

2. A list of fiction set in Toronto. Local Literature!!

3. Two lists to argue with. The first is a list of the 100 most influential books ever written. This list was compiled and published by a male person in 1998. It contains three (3) female authors. That’s 3%. Then there’s the interestingly titled list, Literary Taste: How to Form it. One forms literary taste by reading the authors on the list. This list was first compiled in 1909, then updated in 1935, both times by a male person. The combined list contains (by my count) 360 authors, 26 of whom are female. That’s 7.2%. 65 years earlier than buddy with the 100 most influential books and his 3%. Now I realize that the point of the two lists is different, and the criteria used in compiling them is therefore different. But women certainly did not gain ground in the 65 years. At. All. Of course there are other things to argue with about the lists. Really? Are these the most influential books? How can you tell? On the literary taste side I find little to argue about as I haven’t read most of the books. Thus, I probably have not properly formed literary taste, and so cannot make a judgment. I HAVE read Jane Austen, and she’s on the literary taste list. Maybe there’s some hope.

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